C#

The What? and Why? of functional programming

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When I talk to fellow programmers about functional programming it’s often about something specific, but occasionally that person will suddenly turn the conversation around and ask “So what actually is functional programming, anyway?”. I will talk about some specific features of FP but I will also cover something more general, a tagline or soundbite with which I could give people an instant sense of the philosophy behind functional programming and how it differs from object-oriented programming. As we will see, however, you can get a lot of the benefits of functional programming even if you don’t program in a function language.

Literally speaking, functional programming means that the basic units of your application (i.e. the bits that you compose together to make a complete program) are functions (as opposed to Object-Oriented Programming when they are classes). However, when it comes to the philosophies of the two, I think we can be a bit broader than that to contrast the two:

The main goal of a code unit in object-oriented / imperative programming is to perform actions

The main goal of a code unit in functional programming is to compute results

Why is this distinction important? It’s why functional programming values concepts such as immutability and purity (which have a whole host of benefits).

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Why records must be sealed

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When most people (and I include myself in this) start to learn a functional programming language like F#, they are immediately surprised by the lack of inheritance. It’s such a mainstay of our daily programming that we’re initially nonplussed when it’s taken away… In this post I want to talk about the problems introduced by mixing inheritance with the notion of structural equality, and thus why any language which implements the concept of a record type must also prohibit inheritance of such a type.

For the record (ahem), a record is a type where one simply declares the shape of the class (i.e. the names and types of the public members), and then the constructor, equality and hashcode methods are generated for you by the compiler. An example in F# might be this:

type PersonName = { firstName : string; surname : string }

which is roughly equivalent to the following C#:

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Roslyn analyzers

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I’ve finally decided to get in on that sweet, sweet Roslyn action and write myself an analyzer (please forgive the American spelling–since I’m programming against a series of types defined in American I’ve decided to use their spelling).

You’ll probably know I’m a big fan of functional programming and I’m trying to write my C# in a more functional style; I’ve found that you can get many of the benefits of functional programming even though you’re not writing in a functional language.
As it turns out, sometimes removing certain features from your programming language (or, at least, disallowing certain actions) can actually improve your code. An easy example of this is the goto statement; despite the fact that the C# language supports goto nobody uses it because it’s widely regarded as a harmful thing to do.

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The dangers of primitive obsession

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Primitive obsession is, like many facets of modern programming, something that has been written about many times before (e.g. http://sourcemaking.com/refactoring/primitive-obsession, http://blog.thecodewhisperer.com/2013/03/04/primitive-obsession-obsession/), yet still we see its ensnaring of unwary programmers.

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My proposed syntax for record types in C#

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With the impending release of C# 6.0 and all its new features, I have been thinking about what might come in the next version of C# (v7.0, I’m guessing). There has been talk in the Roslyn forums about things such as pattern matching and record types (the latter being especially important since the primary constructors feature was dropped from C# 6.0).

Below is a quick sketch of how I think record classes should work in C#. You can probably tell that I spend a lot of time programming functionally, because I’ve included a number of syntax features here to make immutability a very easy option.

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